C&C 2019 Call for Pictorials

Important Dates

Deadlines are specified as Anywhere on Earth time.

Pictorial Chairs

Call Description

In the aim of supporting interdisciplinary modes of research practice and dissemination ranging from the arts to science, from design to education, the C&C 2019 conference proceedings includes a Pictorials track. The pictorials track aims to better support the visual communication of—for example—Art and design-oriented research practices, processes, artifacts, and theoretical developments. Through C&C 2019 Pictorials, practitioners in academia, industry, non-profits, or collectives are encouraged to express and unpack their research on creativity in rich, heavily visual ways. We are particularly interested in supporting international creativity research and the creativity-oriented artistic practice and explorations through continuing this form for disseminating research outcomes.

Pictorials are papers and essays in which the visual components (e.g. annotated photographs, Artwork, collages, diagrams, field notes, illustrations, photographs, renderings, sketches) are foregrounded as the most important part of the contribution over the accompanying text. In pictorials, production values and visual quality matters. This format will help foster discussions among authors, conference attendees and the wider community through the sharing of methods, insights and lessons learned from engaging in research.

This CFP is modeled after texts designed by previous Pictorials chairs, both specifically for C&C 2017, as well as more generally those used for DIS 2014, 2016, 2017, & 2018. The C&C and DIS conferences are collocated and calendar adjacent to one another this year. Both have Pictorials tracks. In general, if your pictorial focuses primarily on creativity or cognition either in theory or practice, your pictorial would be a good fit for the C&C track. Please read the CFPs carefully, as you make your choice about where to submit. This year we will offer Best pictorial awards and nominations for Best pictorials awards in proportion to the number of submissions received.

What to submit

We welcome submissions related to understanding human creativity in its many manifestations as well as the conference theme of Transformational Creativity. In this broad context, submissions may cover diverse topics that include (but are especially not limited to):

We encourage authors to themselves be creative with their submissions and to compose highly visual submissions, which could consist of but are not limited to: annotated photographs, Artwork, collages, diagrams, field notes, illustrations, photographs, renderings, sketches. Other important factors to consider in creating a Pictorial:

Pictorials are expected to be original work created specifically for the pictorials track. Expect the track to be competitive and submit your best work. Please do not submit work you have submitted elsewhere with a few images added. Doing so may violate dual submission rules. Just to be very clear, you cannot submit the same or very similar pictorial to both DIS 2019 and C&C 2019. You may submit previously published work to which you have added significant visual content, provided only that such work is clearly and prominently attributed as such in a footnote to the title with a clear description of what the pictorial adds. In this last case, at least 30% of the material must be new, per ACM rules. You must be the author and copyright holder of all materials you submit, particularly all visual materials. Submitted work must comply with ACM policies. See more details below.

Format

Pictorials must be submitted in the C&C Pictorials 2019 Format and not exceed 12 pages, excluding references. The first page of the submission should include the submission’s title, author(s) and their affiliation(s) (leave blank for double blind review), and a written abstract of no more than 100 words succinctly describing the background and context of the pictorial as well as its contribution to the C&C community. Further written parts known from other conference formats such as Introduction, Conclusion, Discussion, Acknowledgements, and References are optional. The main part of the submission should be an annotated visual composition and we encourage submissions to use the format creatively—see the C&C pictorials example template, which was generated from an Adobe InDesign file.

We strongly advise you to use the InDesign template to compose your pictorial. It is much easier to work with and imagine intensive forms in InDesign. See here for a tutorial about how to use cross-referencing for references in InDesign. If you don’t have access to InDesign, please use the current ACM extended abstract template. All submissions should be anonymous and submitted via the C&C 2019 PCS system.

Where to Submit

Please submit via the Precision Conference (PCS) website. The link will be available soon.

Review and Selection

Double blind-review submissions are juried by the C&C Pictorials program committee, recruited from academia and industry by the chairs of the venue. Accepted C&C Pictorials will be distributed by the conference and in the ACM Digital Library where they will remain accessible to researchers and practitioners worldwide. Authors will be expected to attend the conference and will be assigned a time and location to present accepted submissions to conference attendees.

Questions

pictorials2019@cc.acm.org

Program Committee

Coming soon

Pictorials in more detail

Pictorials are papers in which the visual components (e.g. annotated photographs, Art work, collages, diagrams, field notes, illustrations, photographs, renderings, sketches) are the primary means of conveying information with at least, if not more, importance as the accompanying text.

Pictorials are part of the technical program. Pictorials are equivalent contributions to Full Papers in every way (e.g. production standards, archival qualities, reviewing standards, presentation times, institutional reporting). The differences are in the format.

Like full papers, the possibilities of content and approach for pictorials are broad. They may be a reporting of—for examples—research though design, or ethnography, or empirical work, or theoretical work, or thoughtful essays on the role of creativity and cognition in the world. That is, the possible approaches to pictorials are as varied as the possible approaches to full papers. Success is a matter of quality and contribution of knowledge—broadly defined—to the field, rather than approach.

Like full papers, the content of your pictorial is expected to be your own original work for the most part. While it is perfectly fine to include some visual materials created by others with attributions and permissions, such materials must be clearly marked as reference rather than main argument. Just as you would not write a text-oriented paper that is mostly quotes to others, your pictorial must not rely overly on visual materials created by others. On the other hand, your pictorial is expected to reference and build on the work of others with the same scholarly integrity as a full paper.

Pictorials differ from full papers in form only. They are 12 pages not including references in a purpose designed landscape format. Production values matter more. They should be at most half text, and it is theoretically possible that a pictorial may have no text at all outside of the front matter and references. A pictorial that is more than half text is likely better submitted as a paper. Pictorials are an opportunity to report and showcase primarily original visual forms and insights with the same contribution potentials as other archival forms.

Pictorials from C&C 2017: Complete listing

Eli Blevis. 2017. Qualities of Focus. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Creativity and Cognition (C&C ‘17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 309-322. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3059454.3059485

Huaxin Wei and Betty Durango. 2017. Beyond Level Blueprints: Visualizing the Progression of Emotion and Narrative Driven Games. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Creativity and Cognition (C&C ‘17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 171-183. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3059454.3059489

Zhide Loh, Jung-Joo Lee, and Kee Hong Song. 2017. Long Live the Sensor! Designing with Energy Harvesting. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Creativity and Cognition (C&C ‘17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 323-335. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3059454.3059488

Jenny Waycott and Hilary Davis. 2017. Sharing the Housebound Experience through Visual Storytelling. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Creativity and Cognition (C&C ‘17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2-14. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3059454.3059487

Andrew Quitmeyer. 2017. The First Hiking Hacks: Exploring Mobile Making for Digital Naturalism. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Creativity and Cognition (C&C ‘17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 197-208. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3059454.3059486

ACM awarded pictorials: Complete listing

Eli Blevis. 2014. Stillness and motion, meaning and form. In Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems (DIS ‘14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 493-502. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2598510.2602963

Audrey Desjardins, Ron Wakkary, and William Odom. 2016. Behind the Lens: A Visual Exploration of Epistemological Commitments in HCI Research on the Home. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS ‘16). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 360-376. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2901790.2901910

Elvin Karana, Elisa Giaccardi, Niels Stamhuis, and Jasper Goossensen. 2016. The Tuning of Materials: A Designer’s Journey. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS ‘16). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 619-631. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2901790.2901909

Heather McKinnon. 2016. Finding Design Value in Modern Mundanity. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS ‘16). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1059-1071. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2901790.2901906

Thomas Dykes, Jayne Wallace, Mark Blythe, and James Thomas. 2016. Paper Street View: A Guided Tour of Design and Making Using Comics. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS ‘16). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 334-346. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2901790.2901904

Pauline Gourlet and Thierry Dassé. 2017. Cairn: A Tangible Apparatus for Situated Data Collection, Visualization and Analysis. In Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS ‘17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 247-258. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3064663.3064794

James Pierce and Carl DiSalvo. 2017. Dark Clouds, Io&#!+, and [Crystal Ball Emoji]: Projecting Network Anxieties with Alternative Design Metaphors. In Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS ‘17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1383-1393. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3064663.3064795